TED Talks We Love

 

TED is a nonprofit organisation devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks

(18 minutes or less). Here are few that we have loved! 


Ideas Worth Spreading
— TED
 
 

Brene Brown - The Power of Vulnerability

Brené Brown studies human connection -- our ability to empathise, belong, love. In a poignant, funny talk, she shares a deep insight from her research, one that sent her on a personal quest to know herself as well as to understand humanity. A talk to share.

 

Jill Bolte Taylor - My Stroke of insight

BJill Bolte Taylor got a research opportunity few brain scientists would wish for: She had a massive stroke, and watched as her brain functions -- motion, speech, self-awareness -- shut down one by one. An astonishing story.

 

Lissa Rankin, MD - Is there scientific proof we can heal ourselves

New age gurus suggest that we can heal ourselves by simply changing our minds, but is this concept grounded in cold, hard science? Lissa Rankin, MD explores the scientific literature, reviewing case studies of spontaneous remission, as well as placebo and nocebo effect data, to prove that our thoughts powerfully affect our physiology when we believe we can get well.

 

Lorimer Moseley - Why things hurt

Do we actually experience pain, or is it merely illusion? In this video, Lorimer Moseley explores these questions, and position the pain that we feel as our bodies' way of protecting us from damaging tissues further. He also looks at what this might mean for those who suffer from chronic pain.

 

Caroline McHugh - The art of being yourself

 

Lissa Rankin - The #1 Public Health Issue Doctors Aren't Talking about

When Lissa Rankin, MD researched what optimises the health of the body and what predisposes the body to illness, she was surprised by what she found. When asked "What's the greatest risk factor for disease?" she found that perhaps it's not our diet, our exercise regimen, the absence of bad habits like smoking, or genetics that most profoundly affect the health of the body. To her surprise, she found that scientific evidence suggests that loneliness may be the greatest public health issue few people are talking about. We are tribal beings, and when we feel lonely, our nervous systems sense a threat, activating stress responses that predispose the body to illness. When we come together in conscious community, our nervous systems relax and the body's self-healing mechanisms activate, which may be the most important medicine we need. What is the cure for this underrepresented public health issue? Dr. Rankin's prescription may surprise you.

 

Stacey Schuerman - Breath -- five minutes can change your life